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Copy of Referral Letter, per her request, for one of our fosters, Gabrielle

The Paw and Feather Plan Inc

4218 Curtis Ave

Louisville, Ky. 40213

502-309-4155

EIN 36-4966263


January 19, 2023



State Bar, California

845 S. Figueroa St.

Los Angeles, CA. 900017




To Whom It May Concern,



This letter confirms that Gabrielle Attig is an active volunteer with Paw and Feather Plan Inc., a non-profit pet rescue. Ms. Attig donates her time, energy and love to pets in need, and to this rescue, by fostering dogs in need of a place to call (temporary) home, while we find them permanent homes.



To date, Gabrielle has fostered 2 dogs for the rescue. She’s graciously handled some of the transport on her own, and even though the rescue supplies fosters with food, treats, etc., Gabrielle is one of those fosters that has taken it upon herself to supply the foster dogs with whatever they need… without burdening the rescue in any way.


Gabrielle is a strong and direct young woman. -A few weeks ago, I scheduled a dental for a dog in her care without first consulting her on the appointment time. She was quick to politely tell me to inform her first of any appointments moving forward, so we could avoid scheduling conflicts.

I appreciated this type of direct communication, and have no doubt that any worthwhile individuals and/or companies will be equally-appreciative of Ms. Attig’s many distinguished qualities.


Gabrielle’s a hard worker, and although I don’t know much about what she does, I do know she takes great pride in her work with The Rawlings Company.


Lastly, Gabrielle seems to be a person that would only commit to something if she can give it her all. So I have no doubt she’ll make a great attorney, in whatever sub field she decides on, in the great state of California.



Sincerely,


Jessica L. Pita


Jessica L. Pita

Owner and Primary Pet Caregiver, PAFP Inc

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